North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center’s  Celestial Soirée to Honor Louis P. Iglesias

North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center’s Celestial Soirée to Honor Louis P. Iglesias

Roslyn Heights, NY, September 26, 2019North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is proud to announce that Louis P. Iglesias, President and Chief Executive Officer at Allied World Assurance Company Holdings Ltd., will be the honoree at our Celestial Soirée, which will take place on October 24th, 2019 at the Garden City Hotel. 

“I am proud to put my full support behind North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center,” said Iglesias. “Mental health issues are often misunderstood and can cause lifelong struggles, especially for children. Many will suffer from these issues or will be exposed to those who are. The Guidance Center deals with these tough problems head on and truly makes a big difference in our entire community.”

The co-chairs for this year’s gala are John J. Bender, CEO, Global Reinsurance at Allied World Assurance, and Wesley D. Dupont, CEO, Global Legal & Strategy at Allied World Assurance.  Journal co-chairs are Nancy and Lewis B. Lane. The emcee is Stacey Sager, of Channel 7’s Eyewitness News.

“At Allied World, community support is a priority,” said Dupont. “The Guidance Center offers a vital service that benefits local families in need, and we are proud that Lou Iglesias is being honored by an organization that brings hope and healing to so many.”

Emcee Sager spoke eloquently of the need to provide help for children and teens during difficult times. “We all want our children to soar, but let’s not be ashamed to help them weather the turbulence,” she said. “As a mother of two from Long Island, it is my greatest hope that resources such as the Guidance Center can give families and children the tools we need to be at our strongest… especially when life gets bumpy!”

Guidance Center Executive Director Andrew Malekoff noted that the Guidance Center is proud of its commitment to provide essential mental health services to all children and families, regardless of their ability to pay. “The generous support of our donors and sponsors at the Celestial Soirée will help us to maintain the highest standard and quality of care to our community,” he said.

The gala will feature delicious food, live music, dancing and fabulous auction and raffle prizes.  All proceeds will benefit the Guidance Center. To learn more about becoming a sponsor or an underwriter or purchasing tickets, please visit www.northshorechildguidance.org/events, call (516) 626-1971 ext. 309 or email pmadden@northshorechildguidance.org.

About Us:

As the preeminent not-for-profit children’s mental health agency on Long Island, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is dedicated to restoring and strengthening the emotional well-being of children (from birth – age 24) and their families. Our highly trained staff of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation counselors and other mental health professionals lead the way in diagnosis, treatment, prevention, training, parent education, research and advocacy. The Guidance Center helps children and families address issues such as depression and anxiety; developmental delays; bullying; teen pregnancy; sexual abuse; teen drug and alcohol abuse; and family crises stemming from illness, death, trauma and divorce. For more than 65 years, the Guidance Center has been a place of hope and healing, providing innovative and compassionate treatment to all who enter our doors, regardless of their ability to pay. For more information about the Guidance Center, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org or call (516) 626-1971.

Guidance Center Raises over $20k for the Children’s Center at Nassau County Family Court

Guidance Center Raises over $20k for the Children’s Center at Nassau County Family Court

Co-chairs John M. Zenir, Allison Cacace and Robert C. Mangi at the Children’s Center benefit.

Roslyn Heights, NY, September 25, 2019 On Thursday evening September 19th, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center hosted a fundraiser for its Children’s Center at Nassau County Family Court.  The event, which was held at Tesoro’s Ristorante Cucini Italiana in Westbury, featured wonderful entertainment by the High Note band, along with cocktails and a buffet dinner.  

The event raised over $20,000 for the Children’s Center, which provides care and early learning to more than 1,400 children annually, ages 6 weeks – 12 years, while their parents or guardians are conducting court business. 

Andrew Malekoff, Executive Director of the Guidance Center, thanked Joan Antonik and Corinthian Sistrunk, the Children’s Center two full-time staff members, along with the valued volunteers who make the Children’s Center a place of learning, fun and warmth. He also acknowledged Laurie Joseph-Yehuda and Rene Joseph, the daughter and widow of the late Honorable Burton S. Joseph, founder of the Children’s Center.  Laurie is a member of the Children’s Center Advisory Council and Rene painted the beautiful murals on the wall of the Children’s Center many years ago.

Dr. Nellie Taylor-Walthrust, Director of The Leeds Place (under which the Children’s Center operates), thanked co-chairs Allison Cacace, Robert C. Mangi, Esq. and John Zenir, Esq., PC, for their dedication to the fourth annual event. “This fundraiser is critical for the Children’s Center, as funds for it have been drastically cut over the years,” she said. “With the help of all of our supporters, we are able to keep the Center open full time.”

“I am proud to have participated in this fourth annual fundraiser for the Children’s Center,” said co-chair Mangi. “One source of that pride is the number of family law attorneys who supported the children in this endeavor.”

Co-chair Zenir expressed his gratitude to all of the Children’s Center supporters “for helping to provide a safe place for the children while their parents are appearing in court regarding such emotionally tragic cases as domestic violence, neglect and abuse, custody, foster care and child support. For many of these kids their time at the Center helps to assure them that many people care about them and want to help them just be kids.”

The fundraiser was sponsored by an array of local law firms, individuals and other businesses, including Anita & Robert Nigro, Esq.; Aiello, DiFalco & Gianakos, LLP; Barnes, Catterson, LoFrumento, Barnes, LLP; Casino One Limousines; Dimascio & Associates LLP; Ezdrin & Woods, PC; Family of Hon. Burton S. Joseph; Gassman Baiamonte Gruner, PC; Gold Coast Funding, Inc.; Mangi & Graham, LLP; Mark A. Green, PC; Patricia Manzo, Esq.; Mejias, Milgrim & Alvarado, PC; Pessala Family; Sahn Ward Coschignano, PLLC; Spano Abstract Service Corp.; and  John M. Zenir, Esq., PC.

About Us:

As the preeminent not-for-profit children’s mental health agency on Long Island, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is dedicated to restoring and strengthening the emotional well-being of children (from birth – age 24) and their families. Our highly trained staff of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation counselors and other mental health professionals lead the way in diagnosis, treatment, prevention, training, parent education, research and advocacy. The Guidance Center helps children and families address issues such as depression and anxiety; developmental delays; bullying; teen pregnancy; sexual abuse; teen drug and alcohol abuse; trauma; and family crises stemming from illness, death and divorce. For more than 65 years, the Guidance Center has been a place of hope and healing, providing innovative and compassionate treatment to all who enter our doors, regardless of their ability to pay. For more information about the Guidance Center, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org or call (516) 626-1971.


Guidance Center Hosts Free Pediatric Sleep Workshop”

Guidance Center Hosts Free Pediatric Sleep Workshop”

Manhasset, NY, August 29, 2019 —Do you have any infant or toddler who has trouble getting on a regular sleep schedule? You’re not alone! Many parents aren’t sure how to help their children get the right amount of sleep—and that means the whole family is tired.

On October 3rd, 2019, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center will be holding a free Pediatric Sleep Workshop at its Marks Family Right From the Start 0-3+ Center, located at 80 North Service Road, L.I.E., Manhasset. The presenter will be Corey Wilbur, a Certified Pediatric Sleep Consultant, Licensed Family Therapist and founder of Let There Be Sleep LLC. 

Wilbur, a Port Washington mother of two boys, experienced the difficulties of getting her first child on a regular sleep schedule, which led her to want to help other parents facing similar problems.

“I was an exhausted and frustrated parent who had tried everything after the birth of my first son, who had colic,” she says. “I struggled to get him to sleep more than an hour or two in a row at night.”

During the day her son would only nap while being held. “I saw no relief in sight,” says Wilbur. “I wasn’t able to truly enjoy being a mom. Instead, my life revolved around trying to get my son to sleep and taking cat-naps whenever I could.”
 
A colleague recommended that Wilbur use a Certified Sleep Consultant, and she was glad she took that advice. After implementing the suggestions of the Sleep Consultant, in just under two weeks her son went from waking every 2-3 hours at night to sleeping 11-12 consecutive hours at night, as well as taking 90-minute naps by himself.

“It was absolutely amazing!” says Wilbur. “I couldn’t believe how much better I felt and how much more I enjoyed being a mom. I wanted to tell every tired parent how they, too, could get a good night’s rest.”

At the workshop, Wilbur will share tips for parents of young children (ages 4 months—2 years), including:

  • Establishing healthy sleep routines at each age and stage
  • Setting safe sleep spaces that also improve the quality of sleep
  • Reducing sleep associations
  • Reducing cat napping and night wakings

Vanessa McMullan, who heads up the Guidance Center’s Diane Goldberg Maternal Depression Program, says the workshop is a terrific way to help parents to get concrete tips on approaching sleep problems. “Lack of sleep is a big source of stress for many moms and dads, too,” says McMullan. “When children aren’t sleeping, their parents aren’t sleeping, so they are less equipped to handle their responsibilities. It has an effect on the whole family.”

For more information about this free workshop, please contact Vanessa McMullan at the Guidance Center, (516) 484-3174, extension 415 or email VMcMullan@northshorechildguidance.org.

About Us:

As the preeminent not-for-profit children’s mental health agency on Long Island, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is dedicated to restoring and strengthening the emotional well-being of children (from birth – age 24) and their families. Our highly trained staff of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation counselors and other mental health professionals lead the way in diagnosis, treatment, prevention, training, parent education, research and advocacy. The Guidance Center helps children and families address issues such as depression and anxiety; developmental delays; bullying; teen pregnancy; sexual abuse; teen drug and alcohol abuse; trauma; and family crises stemming from illness, death and divorce. For more than 65 years, the Guidance Center has been a place of hope and healing, providing innovative and compassionate treatment to all who enter our doors, regardless of their ability to pay. For more information about the Guidance Center, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org or call (516) 626-1971.

Guidance Center Hosts 23rd Annual Krevat Cup

Guidance Center Hosts 23rd Annual Krevat Cup

Event raises $140,000 to support children’s mental health agency

Roslyn Heights, NY, June 6, 2019 North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center, the preeminent not-for-profit children’s mental health agency on Long Island, once again hosted a joyful fundraising event filled with golf, tennis and an extraordinary dinner program at our 23rd annual Jonathan Krevat Memorial Golf & Tennis Classic. The event, which was held on June 3, 2019 at the beautiful North Hempstead Country Club in Port Washington, raised $140,000 to support the Guidance Center’s work to bring hope and healing to children and families dealing with mental health or substance use challenges.

This year, the event honored the amazing staff of mental health professionals at the Guidance Center. “As they say, it takes a village, and the people who are at the heart of our work healing children and families are an incredible team,” said Andrew Malekoff, Executive Director of the Guidance Center. “Whether they are social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, family advocates or others, they are devoted to providing the most compassionate care for every child, teen or family member who walks through our doors.”

This year’s speaker was Jennifer Pearlman, a licensed mental health counselor at the Guidance Center who received her B.A. in psychology from Queens College and her Master’s in Mental Health Counseling from Brooklyn College. Pearlman shared the inspiring story of one of her young clients who came to her depressed and anxious, but after completing treatment told her, “Miss Jen, you gave me my life back.”

Pearlman described her experience as a social worker as “being there for people in their most vulnerable and desperate times in their life. It is supporting people through crisis. It is empowering people to become their best selves. It is teaching skills and helping people access their inner strength, even when they don’t feel they have it. It is being a safe space for people to share their most intimate thoughts and fears. And it is giving permission for people to express their emotions without fear of judgment.”

Once again, the co-chairs for this year’s Krevat Cup were Michael Schnepper and Board Members Michael Mondiello and Troy Slade. In addition, Dan Donnelly, who was the outstanding emcee, and Board Member Andrew Marcell shared the auctioneer’s block. “It’s all about the kids,” said Donnelly, a longtime supporter of the Guidance Center. “I consider it a privilege to be here today to help raise money to support the incredible work that truly makes a difference in the lives of children and their families.”

About Us:

As the preeminent not-for-profit children’s mental health agency on Long Island, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is dedicated to restoring and strengthening the emotional well-being of children (from birth – age 24) and their families. Our highly trained staff of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation counselors and other mental health professionals lead the way in diagnosis, treatment, prevention, training, parent education, research and advocacy. The Guidance Center helps children and families address issues such as depression and anxiety; developmental delays; bullying; teen pregnancy; sexual abuse; teen drug and alcohol abuse; trauma; and family crises stemming from illness, death and divorce. For more than 65 years, the Guidance Center has been a place of hope and healing, providing innovative and compassionate treatment to all who enter our doors, regardless of their ability to pay. For more information about the Guidance Center, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org or call (516) 626-1971.

National Grid Helps Beautify Guidance Center Site

National Grid Helps Beautify Guidance Center Site

Volunteers plant and paint at Leeds Place in Westbury


Volunteers from National Grid included (left to right) Malcolm Minott, Fran Di Leonardo, Kathleen Wisnewski, Alanna Russo, Susan Eckert, Lauren Benetos and Carie Manticos, pictured with Dr. Nellie Taylor-Walthrust of the Guidance Center.

Roslyn Heights, NY, May 13, 2019 — On May 7, 2019, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center welcomed seven employees of National Grid to its Leeds Place location on Brush Hollow Road in Westbury, one of the Guidance Center’s three sites.

The seven volunteers—who brought with new large decorative planters, several beds of petunias, geraniums, catmint, hostas and juniper bushes, along some white paint—spent the day planting, painting and cleaning the Leeds Place signpost, giving the building a fresh, friendly look.  

“National Grid is happy to partner with North Shore Child & Family Guidance at their Leeds Place,” said Kathleen Wisnewski, National Grid Customer and Community Manager, who was part of the volunteer team. “The planting and beautification project performed by employees from our Customer and Community and IS Teams is another example of how National Grid gives back to the community we live and work in. It’s nice to know that the people entering the Leeds Place will be greeted by beautiful flowers to help brighten their day.”

Fran DiLeonardo, Director, IT Customer Service Management at National Grid, was enthusiastic as he put his all into the project. “It was another great day making a difference in the community that we live and work in!” said DiLeonardo. “It’s always rewarding to put the time aside and make it happen; that’s why we keep coming back!”

“I love meeting new people and learning about the good work they are doing to support folks in their communities who need a little extra help,” said volunteer Susan M Eckert, IT Infrastructure and Operations at National Grid. “It was very inspiring!”

This is the third time this year that National Grid has volunteered for the Guidance Center. “We are very proud of our partnership with National Grid,” said Lauren McGowan, Director of Development, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center. “Everyone is so generous with their time and talents. The volunteers all worked tirelessly to help make the Guidance Center’s Leeds Place office an attractive place for our clients to continue on their path to healing.”

If your company would like to discuss opportunities to volunteer at the Guidance Center or support our mission in other ways, contact McGowan at LMcGowan@northshorechildguidance.org or call her at (516) 626-1971, ext. 320.

 

About North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center:

As the preeminent not-for-profit children’s mental health agency on Long Island, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is dedicated to restoring and strengthening the emotional well-being of children (from birth – age 24) and their families. Our highly trained staff of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation counselors and other mental health professionals lead the way in diagnosis, treatment, prevention, training, parent education, research and advocacy. The Guidance Center helps children and families address issues such as depression and anxiety; developmental delays; bullying; teen pregnancy; sexual abuse; teen drug and alcohol abuse; and family crises stemming from illness, death, trauma and divorce. For more than 65 years, the Guidance Center has been a place of hope and healing, providing innovative and compassionate treatment to all who enter our doors, regardless of their ability to pay. For more information about the Guidance Center, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org or call (516) 626-1971.

 

About National Grid:

National Grid (LSE: NG; NYSE: NGG) is an electricity, natural gas and clean energy delivery company serving more than 20 million people through our networks in New York, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. We are the largest distributor of natural gas in the Northeast. National Grid also operates the systems that deliver gas and electricity across Great Britain.  National Grid is transforming our electricity and natural gas networks with smarter, cleaner and more resilient energy solutions to meet the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050. Our Northeast 80×50 Pathway is an industry leading analysis for how to reach that goal in the states we serve, focusing on the power generation, heat and transportation sectors.  

Read more about the innovative projects across our footprint in The Democratization of Energy, an eBook written by National Grid’s U.S. president, Dean Seavers. For more information, please visit our website, follow us on Twitter, watch us on YouTube, friend us on Facebook and find our photos on Instagram.  

Guidance Center to Host 23rd Annual Jonathan Krevat Memorial Golf & Tennis Classic

Guidance Center to Host 23rd Annual Jonathan Krevat Memorial Golf & Tennis Classic

Roslyn Heights, NY, May 1, 2019North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center will be holding its 23rd annual Jonathan Krevat Memorial Golf & Tennis Classic on Monday, June 3, 2019, at the North Hempstead Country Club in Port Washington, one of the region’s premier courses!

Co-chairs Mike Mondiello, Michael Schnepper and Troy Slade are once again working together to create a stellar event filled with friendly competition, delicious dining and wonderful auction prizes. This year, the event is celebrating the dedicated mental health professionals at the Guidance Center— the people who are at the heart of the many success stories of moving families from hurting to healing.

From Left to Right: Troy Slade, Mike Mondiello, Dan Donnelly and Michael Schnepper

“The reason the Guidance Center changes so many lives for the better is because the staff is composed of caring, compassionate and highly trained individuals,” said Slade, who is a member of the Board of Directors. “I’m thrilled that we are celebrating them at this year’s Krevat Cup.”

“This is going to be a phenomenal event,” said Mondiello, also a member of the Guidance Center’s Board of Directors. “The North Hempstead Country is a beautiful course, and we are excited to hold the Krevat Cup at this elegant location for the first time!”

Established on Long Island’s beautiful and serene Gold Coast in 1916, the North Hempstead Country Club features a tree-lined, superiorly manicured golf course designed by renowned architect A. W. Tillinghast, one of the most creative and productive golf course designers ever.  

In addition to golf, the event will feature round robin tennis (for the non-golfers among the attendees), a delicious brunch and a gourmet dinner after the day’s games conclude. It will also feature a silent and live auction, with prizes ranging from club seats for a Yankee game to exciting vacation packages and much more.

Dan Donnelly, one of the Guidance Center’s most ardent supporters, as well as a former Krevat Cup honoree, will be serving again as the emcee and auctioneer. “I’m so pleased that this year’s event is celebrating the Guidance Center’s amazing staff,” says Donnelly. “The people working here are such caring souls who are truly devoted to saving lives.”

Left to right: Michael Mullman, Ed Geller, Jeff Krevat and Peter Braverman

The other auctioneer for the evening portion of the event is Andrew Marcell, a Guidance Center Board Member. “The Krevat Cup is one of the most enjoyable events of the season,” Marcell said. “It’s a win-win: Everyone has a terrific time while supporting the lifesaving mission of the Guidance Center.”

Andrew Malekoff, Executive Director of the Guidance Center, said, “The event is crucial to our fundraising efforts, and will help us continue to help thousands of children each year who are struggling with issues such as bullying, depression, anxiety and substance abuse.”

Thank you to Fifth Avenue of LI Realty/Americana Manhasset, which has signed on as a Diamond Sponsor.

For those interested in joining a team, attending the dinner, becoming a sponsor or placing a journal ad, it’s not too late! Contact Patrick Madden, pmadden@northshorechildguidance.org, (516) 626-1971, ext. 309.

 

North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is the preeminent nonprofit, children’s mental health agency on Long Island, dedicated to restoring and strengthening the emotional well-being of children (from birth to age 24) and their families. For more than 65 years, the Guidance Center has been a place of hope and healing, providing innovative and compassionate treatment to all regardless of their ability to pay.

About Us:

As the preeminent not-for-profit children’s mental health agency on Long Island, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is dedicated to restoring and strengthening the emotional well-being of children (from birth – age 24) and their families. Our highly trained staff of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation counselors and other mental health professionals lead the way in diagnosis, treatment, prevention, training, parent education, research and advocacy. The Guidance Center helps children and families address issues such as depression and anxiety; developmental delays; bullying; teen pregnancy; sexual abuse; teen drug and alcohol abuse; and family crises stemming from illness, death, trauma and divorce. For more than 65 years, the Guidance Center has been a place of hope and healing, providing innovative and compassionate treatment to all who enter our doors, regardless of their ability to pay. For more information about the Guidance Center, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org or call (516) 626-1971.

Guidance Center Spring Luncheon Raises Over $87,000

Roslyn Heights, NY, April 22, 2019 — A sellout crowd of 245 people joined together on Wednesday, April 17, 2019, for North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center’s Annual Spring Luncheon. This year’s event, which supports the Guidance Center’s mission to restore and strengthen the emotional well-being of children and their families, was a record-breaker, raising more than $87,000.

The luncheon, which took place at Glen Head Country Club, began with a morning round of Mahjong, Canasta and Bridge, along with unique shopping boutiques from some of Long Island’s trendiest and most charitable small business owners, including Buy the Bag, Club & Country, Dash, I Thrive, Transitions and RFC Fine Jewelry, among others.

After a delicious luncheon buffet, Vanessa McMullen, Supervisor at the Guidance Center’s Marks Family Right From The Start 0-3+ Center in Manhasset and also head of the agency’s Diane Goldberg Maternal Depression Program, introduced the day’s speaker, former client Katherine. The audience was completely engrossed as Katherine shared her experience with postpartum depression and talked about the lifesaving treatment she received at the Guidance Center.

She told the crowd, “I was desperately seeking someone who could tell me that I could get through this and convince me that it would get better. When I was finally connected with North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center, my life and my daughter’s life were changed forever. … The Guidance Center has not only given me back my life, it has given my family a future.”

“Katherine’s story was incredibly moving,” said Nancy Lane, Guidance Center Board President. “When she spoke about the dedication of the Guidance Center staff to both her and her family, I was incredibly proud. Our dedicated team of professionals gives their all to bring hope and healing to each and every client.”

The luncheon couldn’t have been so successful without the hard work of the co-chairs, Jan Ashley, Amy Cantor and Alexis Siegel. “The enormous success of this year’s event is largely due to the incredible dedication of our three co-chairs,” said Andrew Malekoff, Executive Director of the Guidance Center. “They have put so much time and energy into the luncheon for several years, and we are truly grateful to them for continuing to make each year more special than the last.”

The Guidance Center is also grateful for the support of its sponsors. They are: Adelphi University, Baxter Smith & Shapiro PC, Amy Cantor, Ruth Fortunoff Cooper, Fara Copell, Linda Cronin, Julie Epstein, Fifth Avenue of LI Realty/Americana Manhasset, Joan & Jeffrey Grant, Janni and Associates/FNA, Deborah Klein, Rosemarie Klipper, Tracey Kupferberg/CBR, NYU Winthrop Women’s and Children’s Services, Raich Ende Malter & Co. LLP, Alexis Siegel, Signature Bank, Ruth & Michael Slade, South Oaks and Zucker Hillside Hospitals – Northwell Health and Carol Wolowitz.

 

About Us:

As the preeminent not-for-profit children’s mental health agency on Long Island, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is dedicated to restoring and strengthening the emotional well-being of children (from birth – age 24) and their families. Our highly trained staff of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation counselors and other mental health professionals lead the way in diagnosis, treatment, prevention, training, parent education, research and advocacy. The Guidance Center helps children and families address issues such as depression and anxiety; developmental delays; bullying; teen pregnancy; sexual abuse; teen drug and alcohol abuse; and family crises stemming from illness, death, trauma and divorce. For more than 65 years, the Guidance Center has been a place of hope and healing, providing innovative and compassionate treatment to all who enter our doors, regardless of their ability to pay. For more information about the Guidance Center, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org or call (516) 626-1971.

Guidance Center, National Grid Helps Students Prepare for Future Careers

Guidance Center, National Grid Helps Students Prepare for Future Careers

Volunteers offer their expertise and generosity at annual Mock Interview Day

Roslyn Heights, NY, March 25, 2019 — On March 22, 2019, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center and National Grid held the second event in their new partnership as two National Grid employees generously donated their time and expertise to coach students in the Mock Interview Day at Nassau B.O.C.E.S. High School in Wantagh.

At this special annual event, more than 150 interviews were conducted, with employees from National Grid, East Meadow Public Library and other organizations speaking with students individually as if they were on an actual job interview.

“The Mock Interview Day is an invaluable experience for students to practice their communication and social skills,” said Suzanne Martin, Youth Employment Counselor at the Guidance Center’s Intensive Support Program at Nassau B.O.C.E.S., where students receive intensive mental health services on site. “It helps them learn how to present their best selves and realize that first impressions do matter when you’re looking for a job.”

“This event was an incredible experience,” said Sarah Kahrs, US Performance Excellence Coach at National Grid and one of the volunteer interviewers. “It was so exciting to be able to take an active role in helping these young adults prepare for their future. In spite of the students coming in a bit nervous, I was so impressed by how prepared they were.”

Paula Gendreau, National Grid Senior Supervisor of Operations, also enjoyed her experience coaching the students. “Volunteering was such a great opportunity,” she said. “I was impressed by all the positive energy! I was fortunate to meet some great candidates, and it was my pleasure to be a part of a wonderful event.”

Martin said that, while most of the students were initially very anxious, they felt very accomplished and proud after their interviews.  “A lot of students thought they didn’t do well, but they got great feedback from their interviewers,” she said. “It’s a real boost for their self-esteem, and we’re so grateful to National Grid and all the participants for their role in making this event such a huge success.”

The event was the second of several that the Guidance Center has planned in partnership with National Grid. “We work with many organizations across Long Island and in NYC helping to prepare students for their future,” said Kathleen Wisnewski, National Grid Customer and Community Manager. “We’re excited about our partnership with the Guidance Center, and we look forward to more events.”


Suzanne Martin, Youth Employment Specialist at the Guidance Center (left), with National Grid’s Sarah Kahrs and Paula Gendreau.

About North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center:

As the preeminent not-for-profit children’s mental health agency on Long Island, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is dedicated to restoring and strengthening the emotional well-being of children (from birth – age 24) and their families. Our highly trained staff of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation counselors and other mental health professionals lead the way in diagnosis, treatment, prevention, training, parent education, research and advocacy. The Guidance Center helps children and families address issues such as depression and anxiety; developmental delays; bullying; teen pregnancy; sexual abuse; teen drug and alcohol abuse; and family crises stemming from illness, death, trauma and divorce. For more than 65 years, the Guidance Center has been a place of hope and healing, providing innovative and compassionate treatment to

all who enter our doors, regardless of their ability to pay. For more information about the Guidance Center, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org or call (516) 626-1971.

About National Grid:

National Grid (LSE: NG; NYSE: NGG) is an electricity, natural gas and clean energy delivery company serving more than 20 million people through our networks in New York, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. We are the largest distributor of natural gas in the Northeast. National Grid also operates the systems that deliver gas and electricity across Great Britain.  National Grid is transforming our electricity and natural gas networks with smarter, cleaner and more resilient energy solutions to meet the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050. Our Northeast 80×50 Pathway is an industry leading analysis for how to reach that goal in the states we serve, focusing on the power generation, heat and transportation sectors.  

Read more about the innovative projects across our footprint in The Democratization of Energy, an eBook written by National Grid’s U.S. president, Dean Seavers. For more information, please visit our website, follow us on Twitter, watch us on YouTube, friend us on Facebook and find our photos on Instagram.  

Spring Is In the Air as Guidance Center Plans Annual Luncheon

Event will feature Mahjong, Canasta, Bridge, great shopping and more

Roslyn Heights, NY, March 18, 2019 — Are you ready for a fun-filled day of shopping, delicious dining and your
favorite games? Then mark your calendars for North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center’s eagerly
anticipated annual Spring Luncheon!

This year’s event will be held at the elegant Glen Head Country Club on Wednesday, April 17 th from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. The Clubhouse, which includes a beautiful ballroom, cozy living room area and spacious card room,
is the perfect setting for a fun-filled afternoon.

For those who love to play, the day will open with Mahjong, Canasta and Bridge. Or, if those popular games
are not your cup of tea, you can jump right in and start shopping at the unique boutiques, which will feature
items from some of Long Island’s trendiest and most charitable small business owners, including Buy the Bag,
Club & Country, Dash, I Thrive, Transitions and RFC Fine, among others. The jewelry and apparel are always
favorites, but just as chic are the fashionable purses, accessories and housewares. There will also be plenty of
opportunities to participate in raffles for luxury prizes, including a $500 gift certificate to Americana
Manhasset.

The event will include a fabulous gourmet luncheon featuring the talents of Glen Head Country Club’s master
chef.

Registration is now open and sponsorships are available by visiting the Guidance Center’s website,
www.northshorechildguidance.org or calling 516-626-1971, ext. 309.

About Us:
As the preeminent not-for-profit children’s mental health agency on Long Island, North Shore Child & Family
Guidance Center is dedicated to restoring and strengthening the emotional well-being of children (from birth –
age 24) and their families. Our highly trained staff of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, vocational
rehabilitation counselors and other mental health professionals lead the way in diagnosis, treatment,
prevention, training, parent education, research and advocacy. The Guidance Center helps children and
families address issues such as depression and anxiety; developmental delays; bullying; teen pregnancy; sexual
abuse; teen drug and alcohol abuse; and family crises stemming from illness, death, trauma and divorce. For
more than 65 years, the Guidance Center has been a place of hope and healing, providing innovative and
compassionate treatment to all who enter our doors, regardless of their ability to pay. For more information
about the Guidance Center, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org or call (516) 626-1971.

Guidance Center and National Grid Join to Help Students Think Big!

Guidance Center and National Grid Join to Help Students Think Big!

New partnership includes inspirational talk on setting future career goals

Roslyn Heights, NY, February 21, 2019 — On February 12, 2019, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center and National Grid launched their new partnership with a Career Day talk at the Center for Community Adjustment (CCA), part of Nassau B.O.C.E.S. in Wantagh.

The speaker was Juan Santiago, National Grid Customer and Community Manager, who quickly won over the students with his engaging tale about his life and career journey, from his beginnings as a kid in Brooklyn who shared three pairs of jeans and a bed with his brother and was admittedly not all that interested in school. But he always dreamed big and went for what he called “stretch goals,” and it shows: Santiago’s career trajectory took him from a grocery store bagger to a successful Navy career to a National Grid meter reader and ultimately his current high-level role with National Grid, all while getting his degree online.

He told the students that there are many paths to success, and if they put their hearts and minds to it, they could reach the highest levels. “Just because someone doesn’t take a traditional route doesn’t mean they are any less motivated,” said Santiago.

When he asked the students what they liked to do, many shared their interests, and he encouraged them to take those passions, make far-reaching goals, and then take the steps needed so that one day, they’d have terrific careers that they’d love.

Assistant Principal Easton Hazell; Kathleen Wisnewski, National Grid Customer and Community Manager; Lauren McGowan, Director of Development at the Guidance Center; Juan Santiago, National Grid Customer and Community Manager; Dena Papadopoulos, Mental Health Counselor at the Guidance Center; and Suzanne Martin, Youth Employment Specialist at the Guidance Center.

For example, one student shared that he was good at fixing things, and Santiago told him that his skill could take him to new heights: “Think big! One day you can design and help build a bridge, or maybe you will go to Japan someday and help build the tallest skyscraper. If you can dream it, you can do it!”

Kathleen Wisnewski, National Grid Customer and Community Manager, said that Santiago’s enthusiasm “pulled the kids in and got them engaged from the very beginning.” The kids were “all smiles” by the end of the talk, she added, and many were eager to pull Santiago aside to ask questions and share their own stories.

“While we encourage the exploration and discussion of various tracks to success within the Guidance Center and Nassau B.O.C.E.S., to hear and connect with someone who has navigated the ‘non-traditional’ route to success often leaves more of a lasting impact with our population of students,” said Dena Papadopoulos, Mental Health Counselor at the Center for Community Adjustment (CCA), Nassau B.O.C.E.S, which is one of three B.O.C.E.S schools at which the Guidance Center runs the Intensive Support Program, or ISP. At each school, students who come from all 56 Nassau districts receive intensive mental health services on site.

Suzanne Martin, Youth Employment Counselor at ISP, added, “All the students responded well and enjoyed hearing Juan’s path to success. They found it encouraging and relatable.” She added, “We’re very grateful to Juan and the National Grid team for bringing us this very special program.”

The event was the first of several that the Guidance Center has planned in partnership with National Grid. “We work with organizations all over Long Island and the city to promote STEM  [science, technology, engineering and math],” explained Wisnewski. “We are excited about our new partnership with the Guidance Center, and we look forward to our future events.”

About North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center:

As the preeminent not-for-profit children’s mental health agency on Long Island, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is dedicated to restoring and strengthening the emotional well-being of children (from birth – age 24) and their families. Our highly trained staff of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation counselors and other mental health professionals lead the way in diagnosis, treatment, prevention, training, parent education, research and advocacy. The Guidance Center helps children and families address issues such as depression and anxiety; developmental delays; bullying; teen pregnancy; sexual abuse; teen drug

and alcohol abuse; and family crises stemming from illness, death, trauma and divorce. For more than 65 years, the Guidance Center has been a place of hope and healing, providing innovative and compassionate treatment to

all who enter our doors, regardless of their ability to pay. For more information about the Guidance Center, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org or call (516) 626-1971.

About National Grid:

National Grid (LSE: NG; NYSE: NGG) is an electricity, natural gas and clean energy delivery company serving more than 20 million people through our networks in New York, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. We are the largest distributor of natural gas in the Northeast. National Grid also operates the systems that deliver gas and electricity across Great Britain.  National Grid is transforming our electricity and natural gas networks with smarter, cleaner and more resilient energy solutions to meet the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050. Our Northeast 80×50 Pathway is an industry leading analysis for how to reach that goal in the states we serve, focusing on the power generation, heat and transportation sectors. 

Read more about the innovative projects across our footprint in The Democratization of Energy, an eBook written by National Grid’s U.S. president, Dean Seavers. For more information, please visit our website, follow us on Twitter, watch us on YouTube, friend us on Facebook and find our photos on Instagram

The Epidemic of Premature Birth in Nassau County,” Blank Slate Media, December 2, 2018

The Epidemic of Premature Birth in Nassau County,” Blank Slate Media, December 2, 2018

Councilwoman Viviana Russell, Dr. Nellie Taylor-Walthrust, Adriann J. Combs and Dr. Martine Hackett

On Nov. 19, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center held a special event at its Leeds Place site in Westbury entitled “World Prematurity Awareness Breakfast.”

At the event, the audience, which consisted of healthcare professionals and community members, learned that over 300,000 babies in the United States are born premature each year, and the statistics indicate a wide racial disparity.

According to the state Department of Health, a black woman is up to four times more likely to die in childbirth than a white mother. In Nassau County, the infant mortality rate per 1,000 live births is 9.4 for black babies versus the 2.2 reported for white non-Hispanic babies.

The three communities at highest risk are (in order) Roosevelt, Hempstead and Westbury/New Cassel.

“Babies — especially black babies — are dying way too soon,” said Dr. Nellie Taylor-Walthrust, director of the Leeds Place. “Many don’t see their first birthdays. I’ve gone to way too many funerals for babies who didn’t survive.”

Dr. Taylor-Walthrust said that the goal of the Guidance Center — in particular, its Good Beginnings for Babies program—is that every mother who comes through their doors gives birth to a healthy baby. The Good Beginnings for Babies program provides support, counseling, advocacy and education for pregnant and parenting teens.

The Guidance Center, in partnership with Hofstra University, has also created a program called Birth Justice Warriors, which focuses on improving the health of black mothers and their babies through education and advocacy efforts.

Birth Justice Warriors are trained to educate the community, including women, pediatricians, nurses, elected officials and others, regarding the racial disparities in an effort to create real change. The ultimate goal is to pass legislation that guarantees that this crucial information is delivered to all women of child-bearing age.

Town of North Hempstead Councilwoman Viviana Russell shared her personal story of having given birth to a premature daughter in 1995. Russell felt that her doctors were not listening to her concerns.

Luckily, her daughter, who weighed only 1 pound and 12 ounces, survived and is now a mother herself, but the experience made Russell want to help others. “As women, we are nurturers, but we need to learn that pre- and post-natal care is as important for us as for our babies.”

Dr. Martine Hackett from Hofstra University, a co-founder of Birth Justice Warriors, pointed out that maternal mortality rates are rising in the United States, whereas they are going down almost everywhere else in the world.

She said that historical patterns of racism have affected black women even in today’s world. “While individual behaviors are important, we must also acknowledge discriminatory biases in the medical community and take steps to reverse them.”

Adriann J. Combs, clinical director of OB/GYN at Northwell Health, presented the March of Dimes Score Card on NY State Prematurity births. While the state received a grade of B, Nassau County only earned a C. “The March of Dimes goals are to ensure improved care for all races, to encourage research and conduct advocacy efforts,” said Combs.

To find out more about the Birth Justice Warriors, contact Dr. Walthrust-Taylor at (516) 997-2926, ext. 229, or email NTaylorWalthrust@northshorechildguidance.org.

The Epidemic of Prematurity in Nassau County Guidance Centers seeks to educate community about racial disparities in birth outcomes

The Epidemic of Prematurity in Nassau County Guidance Centers seeks to educate community about racial disparities in birth outcomes

Roslyn Heights, NY, November 26, 2018 —On November 19, 2018, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center held a special event at its Leeds Place site in Westbury entitled “World Prematurity Awareness Breakfast.”

At the event, the audience, which consisted of healthcare professionals and community members,  learned that over 300,000 babies in the United States are born premature each year, and the statistics indicate a wide racial disparity. According to the New York State Department of Health, a black woman is up to four times more likely to die in childbirth than a white mother. In Nassau County, the infant mortality rate per 1,000 live births is 9.4 for black babies versus the 2.2 reported for white non-Hispanic babies.

The three communities at highest risk are (in order) Roosevelt, Hempstead and Westbury/New Cassel.

“Babies—especially black babies—are dying way too soon,” said Dr. Nellie Taylor-Walthrust, Director of the Leeds Place. “Many don’t see their first birthdays. I’ve gone to way too many funerals for babies who didn’t survive.”

Dr. Taylor-Walthrust said that the goal of the Guidance Center—in particular, its Good Beginnings for Babies program—is that every mother who comes through their doors gives birth to a healthy baby. The Good Beginnings for Babies program provides support, counseling, advocacy and education for pregnant and parenting teens.

Viviana Russell, Nellie, Adriann J. Combs, Martine Hackett

Viviana Russell, Nellie, Adriann J. Combs, Martine Hackett

The Guidance Center, in partnership with Hofstra University, has also created a program called Birth Justice Warriors, which focuses on improving the health of black mothers and their babies through education and advocacy efforts. Birth Justice Warriors are trained to educate the community, including women, pediatricians, nurses, elected officials and others, regarding the racial disparities in an effort to create real change. The ultimate goal is to pass legislation that guarantees that this crucial information is delivered to all women of child-bearing age.

Town of North Hempstead Councilwoman Viviana Russell shared her personal story of having given birth to a premature daughter in 1995. Russell felt that her doctors were not listening to her concerns. Luckily, her daughter, who weighed only 1 pound and 12 ounces, survived and is now a mother herself, but the experience

made Russell want to help others. “As women, we are nurturers, but we need to learn that pre- and post-natal care is as important for us as for our babies.”

Dr. Martine Hackett from Hofstra University, a co-founder of Birth Justice Warriors, pointed out that maternal mortality rates are rising in the United States, whereas they are going down almost everywhere else in the world. She said that historical patterns of racism have affected black women even in today’s world. “While individual behaviors are important, we must also acknowledge discriminatory biases in the medical community and take steps to reverse them.”

Adriann J. Combs, Clinical Director of OB/GYN at Northwell Health, presented the March of Dimes Score Card on NY State Prematurity births. While the state received a grade of B, Nassau County only earned a C. “The March of Dimes goals are to ensure improved care for all races, to encourage research and conduct advocacy efforts,” said Combs.

To find out more about the Birth Justice Warriors, contact Dr. Walthrust-Taylor at (516) 997-2926, ext. 229, or email NTaylorWalthrust@northshorechildguidance.org.

Every Fight Needs a Voice,” by Andrew Malekoff, Blank Slate Media, November 26, 2018

When tragedy strikes, the grief can be overwhelming. One way that some people choose to deal with their pain is to try to make something good come out of a horrible situation. That’s what the parents of Timothy O’Clair did when their 12-year-old son died by suicide on March 6, 2001 after mental health benefits provided by their insurance company ran out.

The O’Clair family fought tirelessly for years for New York State to pass a law requiring health insurance policies to provide access to timely and affordable mental health care in the same way they cover physical illness. The legislation, called Timothy’s Law in honor of their son, was finally signed in December 2006.

Timothy’s Law helped to blaze the trail for a much broader federal law that passed two years later which requires health insurers to provide access to mental health care on par with medical and surgical care.

Now, what would you think if I told you that despite these hard-fought state and federal laws, in New York State national insurance companies are continuing to prevent children like Timmy O’Clair from accessing care and that New York State regulators are assisting them in doing so?

This is precisely the case. As health law expert Brian Hufford stated, “Timothy’s Law appears effective.

In 2009, the state reported an increase of 4.5 million people with plans promising comprehensive mental health coverage. But that number is almost certainly a mirage.” Hufford goes on to say that New York’s insurance regulator, the Department of Financial Services, has a shallow history of enforcement that suggests it lacks the interest or resources to adequately protect New Yorkers.

One year ago North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center issued the results of a groundbreaking study known as Project Access, which surveyed 650 people across Nassau and Suffolk Counties.

The results revealed conditions similar to what the O’Clair family fought against in the early 2000s and showed that discrimination against people living with mental illness and substance use disorders persist.

An immediate follow-up to the Project Access study exposed the reality: the New York State Department of Financial Service is stonewalling demands to further investigate this civil rights issue.

In a letter to DFS Commissioner Mary Vullo citing the Project Access study, state Senators Todd Kaminsky and Elaine Phillips requested a thorough investigation into the persistent problem New Yorkers were experiencing when trying to access timely and affordable mental health care.

Almost five months later Scott Fischer, executive deputy superintendent for Insurance, a division of DFS, responded in writing to the senators.

Fischer wrote: “DFS’s review of the various networks has confirmed that each of the insurance companies in Long Island exceeds the standards for mental health and substance use providers, for the purpose of the commercial products sold outside of the New York State of Health,” the official health plan marketplace.

In other words, this DFS official is stating that there is no problem and nothing more to do, which is contrary to the evidence.

Fischer’s response belies the reality that DFS does little if anything to verify reports from health insurers indicating that they have adequate networks of providers available to their beneficiaries.

I had the privilege of meeting Timothy O’Clair’s dad Tom at a National Alliance on Mental Illness event in Albany in October.

Tom was the driving force behind the passage of Timothy’s Law. We shared a stage in recognition of our mutual efforts to advocate for effective and enforceable parity laws so insurers do, in fact, cover mental health care the same way they do physical illness.

We spoke briefly. I told him that although I never met his son, I keep Timothy close to my heart in the continued fight. He responded, “Keep doing what you’re doing.”

Although it was only the two of us in this fleeting interchange, I’m sure that Tom’s entreaty was meant for all people of good will that know firsthand the devastating impact of untreated mental illness and addiction. We all must keep fighting so Timothy’s Law is a reality and not just mere words on paper.

GUIDANCE CENTER RECEIVES AWARD FOR ADVOCACY WORK 11/15/18

GUIDANCE CENTER RECEIVES AWARD FOR ADVOCACY WORK 11/15/18

Roslyn Heights, NY, November 15, 2018 On October 26, 2018, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center’s Executive Director, Andrew Malekoff, received a “Leaders of Mental Health Awareness Award” from NAMI-NYS (the National Alliance on Mental Illness-New York State) at its 2018 Education Conference in Albany, NY.

“The lack of mental health parity is one of the biggest social justice issues of our time,” said Matthew Shapiro, Associate Director, Public Affairs, NAMI-NYS. “People living with mental illness and addiction are being discriminated against with separate and unequal treatment by insurance providers. New Yorkers are fortunate to have a strong advocate in Andrew Malekoff, who is bringing awareness to this issue and is fighting for access to recovery support services. NAMI-NYS is honored to recognize Andrew as a Parity@10 Champion.”

Andrew Malekoff receiving the award from Ariel Coffman, Board Member of NAMI-NYS

Parity@10 refers to a three-year campaign seeking compliance to the landmark 2008 Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, a federal law that mandates equal insurance coverage for mental health and substance use disorders as compared to other medical benefits covered by the plan. Unfortunately, insurers are not complying with the law and enforcement has been inadequate, leaving millions of Americans at risk.

In an attempt to draw attention to these discriminatory practices, in December 2017, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center released Project Access, a year-long research study that asked 650 Long Islanders about the ease or difficulty of accessing mental health and addictions care. Some of the key findings:

  • Almost half of the participants said that it was more difficult finding help for mental health or substance use problems than finding help for physical illnesses, especially when they were in crisis.
  • Nearly 40% said that their insurance company did not have an adequate number of providers.
  • Two thirds told us that their insurance company was not helpful to them in finding a suitable provider for themselves or a loved one.

NAMI’s Shapiro called the Project Access study “eye-opening for many and a true catalyst for the reforms which are necessary to create a more mentally healthy New York State.”

Accepting the award on behalf of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center, Malekoff told the audience, “The difficulty people have getting mental health and substance use care is not simply a matter of stigma —it’s a civil rights issue and often a matter of life and death.”

Malekoff also acknowledged the dedication of the NAMI members and other advocates who were present at the conference. “Every fight needs a voice, and it’s good to be in a room with so many people who are raising their voices in this most worthy battle.”

To find out more about the Guidance Center’s work, call (516) 626-1971 or visit www.northshorechildguidance.org. The website features a Project Access tab where readers can learn more about advocating for mental health parity and also share their own stories.

Guidance Center Honors John & Janet Kornreich Generous donors support the organization’s Latina Girls Project November 13, 2018

Guidance Center Honors John & Janet Kornreich

Generous donors support the organization’s Latina Girls Project

November 13, 2018

Roslyn Heights, NY, November 13, 2018 —On Wednesday, November 7, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center hosted a celebration honoring John and Janet Kornreich, founders of the John and Janet Kornreich Charitable Foundation, who fund the monthly outings that are such a big part of the Latina Girls Project.

The Guidance Center’s Latina Girls Project is an innovative program that employs rapid response to emergency calls; individual, group and family therapy; and monthly outings and other activities, all designed to tackle the epidemic of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem and suicidal ideation in young Latinas.

Guidance Center Associate Executive Director Regina Barros-Rivera, who heads up the Latina Girls Project, describes how critical the trips are to the success of the program: “In addition to individual and family therapy, monthly outings to places such as museums, theater and other cultural sites are crucial to the Latina Girls Project’s ability to transform these girls’ lives. The trips serve to boost their confidence and sense of independence. They also discover that there’s a great big world of opportunity out there for them, which allows them to feel hopeful about their futures.”

The event Wednesday night, which featured moving speeches from several of the girls who’ve participated in the program, was not only a celebration of the girls’ success but also an opportunity to honor John and Janet Kornreich.

All of the attendees expressed their profound gratitude to the Kornreiches, who were very touched by the girls’ expressions of how profoundly the outings helped changed their lives.

As one girl put it, “The therapy helped my mother and I communicate and become very close, and the monthly outings showed me a world I never would have seen. I felt that I wanted to be a part of the larger world. The trips gave me the feeling that I could be truly happy in my life.”

Barros-Rivera said that the Kornreiches were “angels,” explaining that John walked into the Guidance Center one day and said “tell me how I can help.”

Toward the end of the celebration, both John and Janet Kornreich told the girls that they were so proud of them and that they should be proud of themselves.  The couple also pledged their continued support for the Latina Girls Project.

“We are deeply grateful to John and Janet for their dedication and contribution to this very important Guidance Center program,” said Malekoff. “They make these trips possible, and the trips make the girls see wonderful possibilities in their lives.”

To find out more about the Guidance Center’s work and how you can help, please visit www.northshorechildguidance.org or call (516) 626-1971.

“Beyond Words: Trauma and the Arts,” by Andrew Malekoff, Anton Media Group, Oct 17-23, 2018

Powerful images that depict disturbing events in ways that literature alone cannot can be illuminating and healing. Following are three descriptions of different media that capture recent man-made disasters, still very close to the surface for many of us.

The first, Please Stand By, is an example of cartoon art in the aftermath of 9/11. The second, The Last Lockdown, is about a sculpture created after the mass school shooting in Parkland, FL. Both illustrate the fear-inducing paralysis of traumatic events. The last, Memorial Rock Garden, describes bereaved children painting stones to memorialize their deceased dads.

Please Stand By

In the immediate aftermath of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack on America, several artists joined together to produce a soft cover book titled 9/11: Artists Respond. It is a collection of art, sequenced to showcase the artists’ response to the terror that befell the world.

One nine-frame piece entitled “Please Stand By…,” by Jeph Loeb and J. Scott Campbell, features a girl of about 8 years old watching cartoons on television. By the third and fourth frames, the image on the screen changes to a live feed of the Twin Towers ablaze.

As the little girl stands transfixed, stuffed animal in hand and her face less than 12 inches from the screen, the commentator announces, “We interrupt this program to take you live…”

The little girl turns away and cries out, “Mommy!” The next three frames begin with her mother dropping a basket of laundry. Then, with her face contorted in anguish, she embraces her daughter to shield her from the unrelenting televised images.

The final frame is a close up of the little girl asking, “Mommy, when are the cartoons gonna come back on?”

The Last Lockdown

The next image is a haunting statue, as described by journalist Josh Hafner, of a “small girl cowering beneath an open school desk, clutching a leg as she gazes into the distance with a look of fear in her eyes.”

The sculpture was created by Manuel Oliver, an artist who lost his 17-year-old son Joaquin in the Parkland, FL, mass shooting earlier this year.

As Oliver said, “It’s too late for us to save Joaquin from gun violence, but through art, my family and I are making sure that we protect the rest of the kids out there.”

“Talking about the trauma is rarely if ever enough,” advises noted trauma expert Bessel van der Kolk. He points to the Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem and the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C., “as good examples of symbols that enable survivors to mourn the dead and establish the historical and cultural meaning of the traumatic events to remind survivors of the ongoing potential for communality and sharing.”

Memorial Rock Garden

In 2002 at North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center, a group of boys and girls who lost fathers in the attack on the World Trade Center decorated stones to be placed in a memorial rock garden.

The kids in the bereavement group sat together around a table covered with newspaper. In front of each of them was a large smooth oval-shaped stone. They decorated the stones with unique designs of paint and glitter, each one a personal remembrance of their fathers.
“Mine is painted gold,” beamed Mack. “I painted it gold because my dad is like gold to me.”
A heart framed Jenny’s design, “because my dad will always be in my heart.”

On Seth’s stone were two intertwined hands, a small one and a larger one that showed “me and my dad were best friends.”

Victoria painted a fire hat and said, “My dad is my hero.”

We might do well to remember that when funding cuts threaten to decimate arts programs in schools there is more at stake then we might imagine. The impact of the arts is not measured by standardized tests and its value is incalculable.

Andrew Malekoff is the Executive Director of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center, which provides comprehensive mental health services for children from birth through 24 and their families. 

The Guidance Center Celebrates 65 Years of Hope and Healing

The Guidance Center Celebrates 65 Years of Hope and Healing

 

65th Sapphire Anniversary Gala to Honor Andrea and Michael Leeds,

Americana Manhasset Champions for Charity®

Roslyn Heights, NY, October 12, 2018North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is proud to announce that Andrea and Michael Leeds and Americana Manhasset Champions for Charity® will be the honorees at the 65th Sapphire Anniversary Gala, which will take place October 25th at the Garden City Hotel.

Andrea Leeds has been a Board Member at the Guidance Center for more than 20 years. She and her husband Michael have taken a leadership role in philanthropy and have been passionate, dedicated and committed supporters of the Long Island community.

Every holiday season, Americana Manhasset supports more than 100 not-for-profit organizations during its annual Champions for Charity® holiday shopping benefit, which this year takes place from November 29 through December 2.  (Visit championsforcharity.org for free registration.) Since its inception in 1996, Champions for Charity® has raised nearly $12 million.

The co-chairs for this year’s gala are Matilde and Cliff Broder and Rosemarie and Mitchell Klipper.  Journal co-chairs are Jo-Ellen Hazan and the recently deceased John J. Gutleber, who passed away unexpectedly in September. Auction co-chairs are Deirdre Costa Major and Charles G. Chan. The Mistress of Ceremonies is News 12 Long Island’s Carol Silva.

The gala will feature delicious food, live music, dancing and fabulous auction and raffle prizes. The speaker will be Linda Beigel Schulman, whose son Scott Beigel was murdered during the Parkland, Florida tragedy.

“For 65 years, the Guidance Center has been committed to providing essential mental health services to all children and families, regardless of their ability to pay,” says Executive Director Andrew Malekoff. “The generous support of our honorees, donors and sponsors at the gala will help us maintain the highest standard and quality of care to our community.”

All proceeds will benefit the Guidance Center.  To learn more about becoming a sponsor or an underwriter or purchasing tickets, please visit www.northshorechildguidance.org/events, call (516) 626-1971 ext. 337 or email development@northshorechildguidance.org.

About Us:

As the preeminent not-for-profit children’s mental health agency on Long Island, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center is dedicated to restoring and strengthening the emotional well-being of children (from birth – age 24) and their families. Our highly trained staff of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation counselors and other mental health professionals lead the way in diagnosis, treatment, prevention, training, parent education, research and advocacy. The Guidance Center helps children and families address issues such as depression and anxiety; developmental delays; bullying; teen pregnancy; sexual abuse; teen drug and alcohol abuse; and family crises stemming from illness, death, trauma and divorce. For 65 years, the Guidance Center has been a place of hope and healing, providing innovative and compassionate treatment to all who enter our doors, regardless of their ability to pay. For more information about the Guidance Center, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org or call (516) 626-1971.

NORTH SHORE CHILD & FAMILY GUIDANCE CENTER RAISES OVER $17K FOR  THE CHILDREN’S CENTER AT NASSAU COUNTY FAMILY COURT

NORTH SHORE CHILD & FAMILY GUIDANCE CENTER RAISES OVER $17K FOR THE CHILDREN’S CENTER AT NASSAU COUNTY FAMILY COURT

Roslyn Heights, NY, September 26, 2018 — On Tuesday evening September 24th, North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center hosted a fundraiser for its Children’s Center at Nassau County Family Court. The event, which was held at Tesoro’s Ristorante Cucini Italiana in Westbury, featured wonderful entertainment by musician and soul crooner Paul Loren, along with cocktails and a buffet dinner.

The event raised over $17,000 for the Children’s Center, which provides care and early learning to almost 2,000 children annually, ages 6 weeks – 12 years, while their parents or guardians are conducting court business.

At the event, Nassau County Legislator Joshua Lafazan presented a citation to the Guidance Center honoring the Children’s Center program. “North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center knows that the best investment one can make is in a child,” said Lafazan. “I am proud to support their efforts as they make a difference in the lives of youths and families all across Long Island.”

Seated: Carolyn Germany, Corinthian Sistrunk, Allison Cacace, Robert and Joan Antonik. Standing: Mace Greenfield, Judge Andrea Phoenix.

Dr. Nellie Taylor-Walthrust, Director of The Leeds Place (under which the Children’s Center operates), explained that the Children’s Center is not a babysitting service but rather an early learning center.  “Often this is a child’s first exposure to an early learning environment,” she said. “Every aspect of the Center promotes learning by which the children can explore new things in a safe, structured and professionally supervised setting.”

Lauren McGowan, Bob Mangi, Allison Cacace, Legislator Joshua Lafazan, John Zenir and Andrew Malekoff

Andrew Malekoff, Executive Director of the Guidance Center, thanked the two full-time staff members and the valued volunteers, without whom the Children’s Center’s high level of service wouldn’t be possible. He also acknowledged Laurie Joseph-Yehuda and Rene Joseph, the daughter and widow of the late Honorable Burton S. Joseph, founder of the Children’s Center, who were in attendance.  Laurie is a member of the Children’s Center Advisory Council and Rene painted the beautiful murals on the wall of the Children’s Center many years ago.

Dr. Walthrust thanked co-chairs Allison Cacace, Bob Mangi, Esq. and John Zenir, Esq., P.C. for their dedication to the third annual event. “This fundraiser is critical for the Children’s Center, as funds for it have been drastically cut over the years, though we have been able to keep it open full time,” she said.

Allison Cacace and Judge Andrea Phoenix

The fundraiser was sponsored by an array of local law firms and other businesses, including Aiello, DiFalco & Gianakos, LLP; Barnes Catterson LoFrumento Barnen, LLP; Casino One Limousines; DiMascio & Associates, LLP; Gassman Baiamonte Betts, PC; Mangi & Graham, LLP; Mejias, Milgrim

& Alvarado, PC; Schlissel Ostrow Karabatos, PLLC; The Law Firm of Edwards & Rockmore, PC; The Law Practice of John M. Zenir; The Pessala Family; The Virdone Law Firm, PC; Vishnick McGovern Milizio, LLP; and the family of Hon. Burton S. Joseph, Founder of the Children’s Center at Nassau County Family Court.

“Kids First: A Frozen Moment,” By Andrew Malekoff, Blank Slate Media, September 14, 2018

Three years ago on a bright September morning, my wife Dale phoned me at my office in Roslyn Heights to tell me about something disturbing that had just happened to her. It was a few days before the Jewish New Year when our family comes together.  

Dale and I both grew up in New Jersey. We relocated permanently to Long Island after we were married in 1980. We raised our children here. She has been teaching art to high school students at the Hebrew Academy of Five Towns and Rockaway, a Yeshiva in Cedarhurst, for close to 35 years.

This is the story she told to me.

She had been shopping at King Kullen in Island Park, about a mile-and-a-half from our home in Long Beach. She was standing in a checkout line unloading a shopping cart full of groceries on to the conveyer belt.

A large man stepped up to wait in line behind her. He had only a few items in a smaller hand-held basket. He seemed agitated; she said she thought it was because he’d have to wait.

Trying to be helpful, she pointed out to him that a cashier had just opened another register just a few aisles away and that there was no one standing in that line.

The man didn’t react. He just stood there, muttering under his breath, appearing to be dissatisfied with the pace of the transaction in front of him.

In my wife’s basket were a number of items for cooking and baking traditional foods for the holidays: brisket, chicken, soup greens, matzo ball mix, and so forth.

Also in the basket were four Yahrzeit candles that we light each year at this time to remember our parents, three of whom died in the 1990s, all well before their 80thbirthdays. My mother-in-law Ida was the only one who made it past the age of 80.

The man continued mumbling under his breath and, finally, he said out loud: “You know the ovens are still open.”

It was a frozen moment. The checkout girl and Dale just looked at one another. It was one of those surreal moments that can leave one feeling momentarily numb.

There was no physical altercation, no yelling, no overt anger. But, in my view, it was every bit of a violent moment.

As she recounted her experience she said, “I wish you were there with me.” I thought about that. Had I been there I’m not sure what I would have done. Initiated a physical confrontation?  Shouted him down? Assessed him as mentally disturbed and ignored him? Calmly asked him, “What do you mean by that?” I’ll never know for sure. 

What I do know is that anti-Semitism is alive and well.

My wife’s disturbing experience, on the eve of our High Holy Days, was a fleeting yet indelibly shocking moment and reminder of how close to the surface anti-Semitism is, particularly in the increasingly divided nation our children are inheriting.  

Andrew Malekoff is the Executive Director of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center.

“Kids First: Respecting the Dignity of the Working Person,” By Andrew Malekoff, Sept. 10, 2018

By now I imagine you’ve heard all about “The Cosby Show” actor Geoffrey Owens who was job-shamed for working at Trader Joe’s.

If you haven’t heard or just to refresh: a customer recognized him, snapped a few unflattering photos of him bagging potatoes and sold it to a tabloid news outlet that gave it a derisive can-you-believe-what-he’s-doing-now hook.

If you are a parent, this is a great story to share and discuss with your kids. If you are a young person still in school it is an important lesson to absorb, store away and preserve so you can come back to it. You might find that you will need it one day.

Although Yale graduate Owens admitted to feeling humiliated by being exposed in such a disdainful manner, he said that he was not embarrassed about having a side job at Trader Joe’s and that many working actors need to supplement their income to help support themselves and their families.

Social media picked up his cause, which led to myriad media appearances and a viral social media presence. He used the opportunity to give voice to the dignity of work.

Here is what he said about that in a Sept. 4 Time magazine video interview: “The fact that I, as the guy from ‘The Cosby Show,’ was shamed about working at Trader Joe’s, that story is going to move on, that’s gonna pass. What I hope doesn’t pass is this new recognition, this current sensitivity people are feeling about work and about people working. I hope what continues to resonate is the idea that one job is not better than another. A certain job might pay more, might have better benefits and might look better on paper, but essentially one kind of work is not better, superior to another kind of work and that we reevaluate that whole idea and we just start honoring the dignity of work and respecting the dignity of the working person.”

Ironically, Owens’ job-shaming experience led to thousands of tributes on Twitter, a new acting job with producer-director Tyler Perry and offers of cash gifts from celebrities like rapper Nicki Minaj, all of whom were so moved by Owens.

I found the story to be personally uplifting; and, not because Owens benefited with renewed notoriety and a promising new acting job, but because of his humanity and the dignity he displayed in representing working stiffs all across America, regardless of their stripe or station in life.

Bravo Geoffrey Owens. Well done!

Andrew Malekoff is the executive director of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center.

You can see the Time interview with Geoffrey Owens here: http://amp.timeinc.net/time/5385842/geoffrey-owens-cosby-show-actor-grocery-store-speaks-out?__twitter_impression=true

“Kids First: Look at Where We Have Come,” by Andrew Malekoff, Blank Slate Media, August 31, 2018

“Kids First: Look at Where We Have Come,” by Andrew Malekoff, Blank Slate Media, August 31, 2018

Did you know that every day more than 290 Americans die from suicide or a drug overdose?

With proper treatment, many of these tragedies could be prevented — but despite a law that guarantees coverage, people face enormous roadblocks when they seek care.

In 2008 President George W. Bush signed the landmark Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (Parity Act).

The Parity Act mandates equal insurance coverage for mental health and substance use disorders as compared to other medical/surgical benefits covered by the plan.

According to its new website parityat10.com, “Parity at 10 seeks to ensure that insurance carriers and state Medicaid programs comply with the law so that consumers can access the evidence-based health care they need and are entitled by law to receive.”

What does equal insurance coverage mean?

It means ending insurer discrimination against access to timely and affordable care including high out-of-pocket costs and shorter lengths of care for MH/SUD.

Parity — which is another word for equity — in this case means that MH/SUD coverage must be provided on par with coverage of medical and surgical care.

Notably, this legislation was the result of a bipartisan effort by Sens. Paul Wellstone, a liberal Democrat, and Pete Domenici, a conservative Republican. What the senators had in common were personal family experiences that motivated their tireless efforts to pass this law.

Parity saves lives. Parity law is a civil rights law that has not been vigorously enforced by the States, which have the primary responsibility for enforcement of private insurance and Medicaid.

One of the most pernicious violations and barriers to care is inadequate networks of MH/SUD providers.

North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center documented this in its 2018 Project Access Study which surveyed 650 Long Island consumers of MH/SUD care. Nearly 50 percent of respondents said that it was easier for them to access medical/surgical care than MH/SUD Care.

Nationally, patients responding to a National Alliance on Mental Illness survey reported being denied twice as often for mental health care as for medical-surgical care under the Affordable Care Act.

The actuarial firm Milliman reviewed claims data in New York and found that patients had to go out-of-network for MH/SUD care far more often than for medical/surgical care — a very expensive proposition that flies in the face of the Parity Act.

At North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center, we are a proud partner of the Parity at 10 Compliance Campaign. On August 10 I attended an inaugural Parity at 10 meeting in Albany with my fellow advocates and top officials in the Cuomo administration.

Some of the details in this column were included in the policy brief provided to Gov. Cuomo. The consensus among the advocates was that insurers do everything in their power to skirt parity.

Another staunch supporter of the original legislation was Patrick J. Kennedy, a former member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Kennedy struggled with mental illness and addiction for most of his life.

In his book “A Common Struggle,” Kennedy said the battle ahead is for the law to be enforced in the face of health insurers who stand to profit by denying the full range of coverage for people living with mental illness and addictions.

Kennedy rightly frames the inequities that people with mental illness and addictions face as a matter of civil rights.

Discriminatory insurance coverage for those with mental health and substance use disorders must end. When insurers do not comply with the law and enforcement is inadequate, millions of Americans are at risk.

Andrew Malekoff is the Executive Director of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center, which provides comprehensive mental health services for children from birth through 24 and their families. To find out more, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org.

“Reach Out and Remember,” By Andrew Malekoff, Anton Media Group, September 12, 2018

In the aftermath of the 17th anniversary of September 11, I offer a remembrance of several groups of people—all Queens court personnel—whom I spent a day with in their courthouse, just three days after the 2001 terrorist attack.

The people I met with included individuals with missing relatives or friends, individuals with relatives or friends confirmed dead, individuals who were in the World Trade Center complex during the attack, individuals with family members who barely escaped, and individuals who witnessed the attack and collapse of the Twin Towers from courthouse windows. All were deeply affected. Most were in a state of shock and disbelief.

When I arrived at the courthouse, I learned that I would be meeting with three groups of 8 to 12 people each. I was called in by an official from an Employee Assistance Program to offer a supportive group experience. We met in a vacant courtroom. I arranged chairs around two adjacent prosecution and defense tables.

As I awaited the first group, a court officer said, “Today should be interesting.” I asked him what he meant. He said, “It’s foreclosure Friday.” He explained that every Friday they have an auction of foreclosed property and, typically, about 200 Arab-Americans participate in the auction, signaling a sense of mounting unease with people of Middle Eastern descent.

I greeted the first group, and one by one the participants revealed signs and symptoms of trauma and stress. These included numbness, shock, headaches, loss of appetite, aches and pains, frequent trips to the bathroom, sleeplessness, flashbacks, startle responses to loud noises (especially airplanes), helplessness, gruesome nightmares, anger, uncertainty, guilt and fear.

Fear was a powerful theme. Many felt that the courthouse was unsafe. During the final group meeting a female court officer walked in unannounced and searched for explosives, explaining there was a bomb threat.

At least one or two people wept openly in each group, women and men. In each group at least one person left the room to compose themselves and then came back. More than one person said, “I can’t stop crying.” And more than one said, “I can’t cry.”

Anger was a prevailing theme. There was anger at the government. “How could they let this happen?” they asked.

Many shared feelings of disbelief, saying how surreal it seems. One said, “I am in a semi-daze; I feel like I’m not even here.”

Guilt was prevalent, especially about going on with mundane day-to-day activities. A court officer said he felt insignificant, like “a grain of sand.” He said he felt helpless and wondered if he was going crazy.

One group participant’s son escaped from the 78th floor. He took the stairs. His co-workers waited for the elevator. They didn’t survive. The son’s story was retold by his mother through sobs. When he emerged from the building, she shared, he witnessed “flaming bodies falling from the sky.” Two others held her hands as she told the story.

In each group people reached out to comfort one another through physical touch and understanding words. In one group a woman who said she couldn’t understand why she hadn’t cried was brought to tears by another’s pain over a missing sister.

In closing, the participants in one group agreed that “it’s good to know you’re not alone,” and “it’s good to know you’re not going crazy.”

I found the intensity of that experience and the participants’ ability to reach out to one another moving. Although I was there to facilitate, my role was to bear witness. It confirmed for me what I was already feeling; when facing incomprehensible tragedy and overwhelming grief we must push ourselves to forgo isolation and reach out to one another.

Andrew Malekoff is the executive director of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center.

“Kids First: Look at Where We Have Come,” by Andrew Malekoff, Blank Slate Media, August 31, 2018

“Kids First: Look at Where We Have Come,” by Andrew Malekoff, Blank Slate Media, August 31, 2018

Did you know that every day more than 290 Americans die from suicide or a drug overdose?

With proper treatment, many of these tragedies could be prevented — but despite a law that guarantees coverage, people face enormous roadblocks when they seek care.

In 2008 President George W. Bush signed the landmark Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (Parity Act).

The Parity Act mandates equal insurance coverage for mental health and substance use disorders as compared to other medical/surgical benefits covered by the plan.

According to its new website parityat10.com, “Parity at 10 seeks to ensure that insurance carriers and state Medicaid programs comply with the law so that consumers can access the evidence-based health care they need and are entitled by law to receive.”

What does equal insurance coverage mean?

It means ending insurer discrimination against access to timely and affordable care including high out-of-pocket costs and shorter lengths of care for MH/SUD.

Parity — which is another word for equity — in this case means that MH/SUD coverage must be provided on par with coverage of medical and surgical care.

Notably, this legislation was the result of a bipartisan effort by Sens. Paul Wellstone, a liberal Democrat, and Pete Domenici, a conservative Republican. What the senators had in common were personal family experiences that motivated their tireless efforts to pass this law.

Parity saves lives. Parity law is a civil rights law that has not been vigorously enforced by the States, which have the primary responsibility for enforcement of private insurance and Medicaid.

One of the most pernicious violations and barriers to care is inadequate networks of MH/SUD providers.

North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center documented this in its 2018 Project Access Study which surveyed 650 Long Island consumers of MH/SUD care. Nearly 50 percent of respondents said that it was easier for them to access medical/surgical care than MH/SUD Care.

Nationally, patients responding to a National Alliance on Mental Illness survey reported being denied twice as often for mental health care as for medical-surgical care under the Affordable Care Act.

The actuarial firm Milliman reviewed claims data in New York and found that patients had to go out-of-network for MH/SUD care far more often than for medical/surgical care — a very expensive proposition that flies in the face of the Parity Act.

At North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center, we are a proud partner of the Parity at 10 Compliance Campaign. On August 10 I attended an inaugural Parity at 10 meeting in Albany with my fellow advocates and top officials in the Cuomo administration.

Some of the details in this column were included in the policy brief provided to Gov. Cuomo. The consensus among the advocates was that insurers do everything in their power to skirt parity.

Another staunch supporter of the original legislation was Patrick J. Kennedy, a former member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Kennedy struggled with mental illness and addiction for most of his life.

In his book “A Common Struggle,” Kennedy said the battle ahead is for the law to be enforced in the face of health insurers who stand to profit by denying the full range of coverage for people living with mental illness and addictions.

Kennedy rightly frames the inequities that people with mental illness and addictions face as a matter of civil rights.

Discriminatory insurance coverage for those with mental health and substance use disorders must end. When insurers do not comply with the law and enforcement is inadequate, millions of Americans are at risk.

Andrew Malekoff is the Executive Director of North Shore Child & Family Guidance Center, which provides comprehensive mental health services for children from birth through 24 and their families. To find out more, visit www.northshorechildguidance.org.

“Lessons from the Field,” by Andrew Malekoff, Anton Media’s Long Island Weekly, Aug 22-28 2018

In recent years I have written about concussions in youth sports in this space, with a special focus on Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive degenerative disease of the brain that is the result of repetitive brain trauma. This was something I knew nothing about in my teenage years. As a high school and college football player in the 1960s and ’70s, using one’s head as a battering ram and shock absorber was expected.

Beyond the discovery of CTE and what it has generated in the way of much-improved player safety, August never fails to evoke memories of twice-daily summer practices when guys like me went to “training camp” before school started. Training camp lasted about two weeks. It was usually hot out. They were two weeks that felt like a year. Those were the make or break days of my youth. No one was cut from the team as long as they showed up, but many did not last.

The rawest depiction of a brutal summer football camp can be found in the book The Junction Boys by Jim Dent. The subtitle of the book is How Ten Days in Hell with Bear Bryant Forged a Championship Team. Although I never went through anything quite like the Junction Boys did, it seems that all high school and college football players have similar war stories about summer camp.

I’m not about to rehash what I’ve since learned since the discovery of CTE and the need for protective measures or share stories from my summer football camp days. However, at the risk of being cliché, there are some important lessons I learned from playing football.
As we round out another August, I thought I’d share a few of those lessons here. Most have served me well. Some have a downside.

1. Punctuality

As the saying goes, showing up is half the battle. But don’t just show up; be there on time. In football there were serious consequences for being late, but losing the respect of one’s peers eclipsed them all.

2. Hard work

Know that when you are working hard, there are others working just as hard and others who are not. Push yourself to surpass your opponents and inspire your teammates.

3. Stoicism

Keep your head up. Push through disappointment and injuries. This is mostly a good trait, but it can also prevent you from seeking the support you need when you really need it, physically and emotionally. Vulnerability is not a lesson I learned in football.

4. Dependability

It is essential that others who are pulling with you toward accomplishing a goal know that they can always count on you. There is a brotherhood that forms on a football team that demands dependability.

5. Humility

Enjoy success but don’t be boastful. Have gratitude for all those who helped to support your success.

6. Perseverance

Never give up. It is what your adversaries expect. By pushing through missteps and setbacks you learn what it takes to succeed and that your capacity to overcome failure is greater than you anticipated.

7. Resilience

As the legendary coach of the Green Bay Packers Vince Lombardi said, “It’s not whether you get knocked down; it’s whether you get up.” To survive playing football, resilience is essential.

Fortunately, these lessons can be learned in many places other than the football field. Any group activity that requires teamwork, sacrifice and shared goals generate important life lessons. Make sure the young people in your life put down their cellphones and other tech gadgets and take up a sport, join a club or get involved in the arts, to name a few possibilities. They’ll grow into better people—and with no head-butting required.